Since 2016

Topology finding tackles the exploration of the topological properties of a structure, by analogy and in complement to form finding.

Topology finding tackles topological exploration of shapes and patterns of shell-like structures, by analogy and in complement to form finding.

This research focuses on the singularities in force patterns, like thrust networks and load paths, and materialized patterns like voussoir tessellation for masonry vaults, beam grids for elastic gridshells, corrugation reinforcements for shells or strips for membranes.

Two complementary approaches have been developed:

  • a feature-based approach provides an intuitive means to explore patterns respecting alignment to the boundaries of a surface, including point and curve features, which can stem from statics heuristics; and,
  • a rule-based approach provides a grammar for comprehensive exploration by bringing structuredness to the topological design space. A rule-based distance between topologies allows adjacent designs to be generated and combined, and to respect topological requirements, like two-colorability through projection to constrained sub-spaces.

This research is implemented in the toolbox singular from compas_pattern, a package of COMPAS, to be released in Spring 2019.

This research is a joint effort with the Block Research Group, Institute of Technology in Architecture, ETH Zürich.

People

Collaborators

Institutions

  • Laboratoire Navier, École des Ponts ParisTech
  • Block Research Group, ETH Zürich

  • All
  • Architectural Geometry

 Feature-based Topology Finding of Patterns for Shell Structures – R. Oval et al. (2019)

Authors

R. Oval, M. Rippmann, R. Mesnil, T. Van Mele, O. Baverel, P. Block

Abstract

This paper introduces topology finding of patterns such as beam grids for gridshells or voussoir tessellations for masonry vaults, among others. The authors refer to topology finding, by analogy and in complement to form finding, as the design of the connectivity of patterns in order to follow architectural, structural and construction requirements. This paper presents an automated generation and a rule-based exploration for coarse quad meshes that encode the data about the singularities and their relationships in the pattern. The automated generation relies on the medial axis of an input shape, and the rule-based exploration on a quad mesh grammar. These coarse quad meshes are further computed for the design of structured patterns integrating the boundary and features of the input shape. This design framework is an aid for topological exploration of patterns for shell-like structures by architects and engineers.

Status

Accepted

Journal

Automation in Construction

Links

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 Topology Finding of Structural Patterns – R. Oval et al. (2018)

Authors

R. Oval, M. Rippmann, R. Mesnil, T. Van Mele, O. Baverel, P. Block

Abstract

This paper presents a strategy for the exploration of the topology of structural patterns, such as beam grids for gridshells or voussoir tessellations for masonry vaults. The authors define topology finding, by analogy and in complement to form finding, as the design of the connectivity of patterns in relation to architectural and structural requirements. The method focuses on the design of the singularities in the pattern through the automatic generation and subsequent rule-based editing of a coarse quad mesh that encodes the properties of the singularities and their relationships before mesh densification, pattern mapping, geometrical exploration and performance assessment.

 

Date

Sept. 2018

Conference

Advances in Architectural Geometry 2018

Links

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 Patterns for Masonry Vault Design – R. Oval et al. (2017)

Authors

R. Oval, M. Rippmann, T. Van Mele, O. Baverel, P. Block

Abstract

This paper presents a methodology to generate structural patterns for masonry vault design. First, a quad- dominant block decomposition is proposed based on a medial axis pruning/rebranching method from an input that comprises outer and inner boundaries as well as point and curve features, representing a point load or a crease in the structure, for instance. The meshing and smoothing of the resulting set of patches is straightforward and the mesh densities can be controlled globally and locally. The resulting meshes can be processed for form finding and further optimisation. Second, fabrication-and construction-aware rules to convert these form-found patterns into a tessellation are proposed.

Date

Sept. 2017

Conference

IASS 2017

Links

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> pdf

Coming soon